The Dublin Pass: An Easy Way To Save Money On The Most Popular Attractions In Dublin

the dublin pass
Photo of the Storehouse via Diageo

Similar to the Heritage Card, the Dublin Pass (buy it here) is another handy way to save money during your trip to Ireland.

In a nutshell, you buy the Dublin Pass (info on how much it costs below) for a set price and it gives you access to many of the most popular Dublin attractions, like Dublin Castle and the Jameson Distillery.

If you’re visiting Dublin for the first time and you’re looking to see and do as much as possible, the Dublin Pass should save you a decent chunk of cash.

It also gives you fast track entry, which is pretty damn useful if you visit Ireland during the busier months of the year. Below, you’ll find out everything you need to know about the Dublin Pass (and how much it can save you).

The Dublin Pass in a nutshell

The Dublin Pass is a sightseeing card that gives you free entry to over thirty of Dublin’s top attractions. It also gives you fast track entry at some of the busier attractions in the city.

Now, they say that it gives you ‘free entry’ to these attractions, but it doesn’t really. You buy the card for a set price and then you use it as your ticket to enter the attraction.

You only begin to get ‘free entry’ when you’ve started to save money on ticket prices. At the end of this guide, you’ll find out how much you can save if you’re visiting Dublin for 24 or 48 hours (it’s a solid amount!)

How much is the Dublin Pass?

The Dublin Pass has a number of different price options, depending on how long you want it for. Note: there tends to be regular discounts on the cost of the pass, so keep an eye on their website.

  • 1 Day Adult ticket: €69.00
  • 1 Day Child ticket: €36.00
  • 2 Day Adult ticket: €89.00
  • 2 Day Child tiket: €45.00
  • 3 Day Adult ticket: €109.00
  • 3 Day Child ticket: €61.00
  • 5 Day Adult ticket: €139.00
  • 5 Day Child ticket: €80.00

How it works and where to buy it

You buy the pass. Download it onto your phone or collect it from a collection point (info below). And you use it to gain entry to the attractions you want to visit. It’s that simple.

The handiest way to buy the Dublin Pass is online. You can order it through their website and you can choose whether you want to collect it or have it sent to your phone. If you decide that you want to collect it, there are two different collection points where you can pick it up:

  • Visit Dublin Centre in City Centre, 25 Suffolk Street, Dublin 2
  • Discover Ireland Centre in City Centre, 14 Upper O’Connell Street, Dublin 1

What attractions are included on the Dublin Pass?

When I first came across the Dublin Pass I assumed that it’d only be the smaller tourist attractions in Dublin that would be taking part, but I couldn’t have been more wrong.

The Dublin Pass gives you access to some of the biggest attractions in the capital, like the EPIC Museum, the Guinness Storehouse, Dublin Castle, the Jameson Distillery, the GPO Witness History Visitor Centre and plenty more.

Here’s a full list of the attractions included:

  • Newbridge House and Farm (usually costs €12)
  • Christ Church Cathedral (usually costs €8)
  • Dublina (usually costs €12)
  • Dublin Castle (usually costs €8)
  • St. Patrick’s Cathedral (usually costs €8)
  • 14 Henrietta Street (usually costs €9)
  • The Jeanie Johnston (usually costs €11)
  • The Museum of Literature Ireland (usually costs €8)
  • Malahide Castle (usually costs €14)
  • Farmleigh House & Estate (usually costs €8)
  • Irish Rock ‘n Roll Museum Experience (usually costs €16.50)
  • Dalkey Castle & Heritage Centre (usually costs €10.50)
  • EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum (usually costs €16.50)
  • Jameson Distillery Bow St. Tour (usually costs €25)
  • GPO Witness History Visitor Centre (usually costs €14)
  • Teelings Whiskey Distillery Tour (usually costs €17)
  • Glasnevin Cemetary Museum & Guided Tour (usually costs €14.50)
  • Guinness Storehouse (usually costs €26)
  • Dublin Hop on Hop Off Bus Tour (usually costs €24)
  • Croke Park Stadium Tour & GAA Museum (usually costs €15)
  • James Joyce Centre (usually costs €5)
  • The Little Museum of Dublin (usually costs €10)
  • Dublin Zoo (usually costs €20)
  • National Botanic Gardens (usually costs €6)
  • National Wax Museum Plus (usually costs €16.50)

How much you could save

OK, let’s take a few different examples to show how much you could save if you picked up a Dublin pass for both a one-day visit to Dublin and a two-day visit to Dublin.

Now, you can also get 3 and 5-day passes, but the chances of you spending that long in Dublin are probably reasonably slim.

How much you’d save over 24 hours in Dublin

OK, so you’re in Dublin for 24 hours and you fancy seeing a good chunk of what the city has to offer. You’re on a budget and you want to stay in the city to avoid taxis or public transport.

Let’s say you got up nice and early and made a trip to Dublina (for a Viking buzz) first thing followed by a visit to Dublin Castle. You then walked down the quays to the EPIC museum and had a nosey around there.

Then you had lunch and chilled for a bit before heading to the GPO to do the Witness History tour.

  • Dublina (usually costs €12)
  • EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum (usually costs €16.50)
  • Jameson Distillery Bow St. Tour (usually costs €25)
  • GPO Witness History Visitor Centre (usually costs €14)
  • Guinness Storehouse (usually costs €26)

If you visited all of the attractions above, it’d cost you over the day €93.50. If you had bought the one-day Dublin Pass (€69) you’d have saved €24.50.

How much you’d save over 48 hours in Dublin

OK, so you’re spending a weekend in Dublin. Here’s where you’ll really save a few quid with the Dublin Pass. Let’s say that, over the two days, you followed an itinerary similar to the one below.

Day 1

  • Christ Church Cathedral (usually costs €8)
  • Dublina (usually costs €12)
  • Dublin Castle (usually costs €8)
  • St. Patrick’s Cathedral (usually costs €8)
  • EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum (usually costs €16.50)
  • Jameson Distillery Bow St. Tour (usually costs €25)

Day 2

  • GPO Witness History Visitor Centre (usually costs €14)
  • Guinness Storehouse (usually costs €26)
  • Dublin Hop on Hop Off Bus Tour (usually costs €24)
  • The Little Museum of Dublin (usually costs €10)

If you visited each of the attractions above over a weekend, you’d fork out €151.50. If you had bought the 2-day Dublin Pass (€88), you’d have saved €63.50.

My thoughts on whether it’s worth buying

Now, a quick disclaimer here – as mentioned at the start of this guide, the links to the Dublin Pass that you’ll find within this article are what are known as ‘Affiliate Links’.

In a nutshell, if you click one of the links and buy the pass, I’ll make a tiny (literally) commission. If you’re thinking, ‘This fella’s trying to sell me some because he’ll make a few quid off of it’, I wouldn’t blame you.

However, if you’ve read the review policy for this website, you’ll know that if something is sh*te, I’ll tell you it’s sh*te – I wouldn’t risk compromising the Irish Road Trip for a few quid.

My honest opinion

So, I’ll be honest – when I first heard of the Dublin Pass a few years back, I thought it sounded crap. I saw some travel sites talking about it but I just didn’t really see the point of buying it.

Fast-forward to 2020 and things have changed. The Dublin Pass offers access to a clatter of Dublin’s main attractions that you can actually save a decent few quid on.

Who should buy it

If you’re visiting Dublin for 24 hours or longer and you fancy seeing as much as you can, the chances are you’ll save money by buying the Dublin Pass.

It gives you access to many of the top fee-paying attractions in Dublin, like Dublin Castle, the Jameson Distillery, Dublin Zoo, the hop-on, hop-off bus tour and the Guinness Storehouse.

Who shouldn’t buy it

I’d argue that if you’re not planning on visiting the alcohol-based attractions, like the Guinness Storehouse, then you probably won’t benefit as much as those who are.

The distilleries and the brewery tours are the ones that tend to cost more, as you get a drink/a tasting platter (and sometimes food) included in the cost of the ticket.

Also, if you’re looking to do Dublin on a very tight budget and you’re only looking to visit free attractions, it’s an additional cost.

Frequently asked questions about the Dublin Pass

I’ve tried to tackle as many FAQs about the Dublin Pass that I could think of below. If you have a question that I haven’t covered, ask away in the comments section.

Which popular attractions can you get fast track entry into?

With the Dublin Pass, you’ll get priority entry into the Guinness Storehouse, Dublin Zoo, the National Wax Museum, Dublinia, the James Joyce Centre and EPIC: The Irish Emigration Museum.

If I use it for the Guinness Storehouse, what do I actually get?

If you use your Dublin Pass for the Guinness Storehouse, you’ll get fast track entry, the full tour and a complimentary pint in the newly renovated Gravity Bar.

Does the Dublin Pass include all fee-paying attractions in Dublin?

No, it doesn’t! The Dublin Pass will only give you free access and fast track entry to the attractions listed in the guide above.

Howaya! Thanks for visiting the Irish road trip! This site exists to inspire and guide you on an Irish adventure that’ll give birth to a lifetime of memories (sounds very arsey altogether, I know!) You'll find everything from things to do in Ireland to where to stay in Ireland (unique and unusual places) if you have a nosey around!

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